the muppets are in the crypt

Ask me anything   the wit and wisdom of the enthusiastic

twitter.com/Aw_Pumpkin:

    fishcustardandthecumberbeast:

    tsundereslasher:

    E.T., what about E.T.?

    That moment when Jeremy realises he’s in his 40’s.

    Oh goooood.

    (via sionnach)

    — 18 hours ago with 28367 notes

    Extreme nostalgia. I’m quite glad twitter didn’t exist in the 90s.

    (Source: andersondaily, via neenya)

    — 18 hours ago with 5244 notes

    If there could just stop being photos of him in golden light

    (Source: sebstandaily, via clintbartons)

    — 23 hours ago with 7883 notes

    #it's about the light honest  #Stan 

    "Priya does not belong in the Dollhouse."
    "She does now."

    I think Sierra’s story was my favourite.

    (Source: beingfacetious, via whedonesque)

    — 1 day ago with 522 notes

    queenklu:

    ailelie:

    Sometimes a vid is just perfect. Captain America and The Avengers through Steve’s point-of-view. The timing is perfect. The lyrics match up wonderfully. Great vid.

    The War Was In Color - Carbon Leaf

    (via magicalrocketships)

    — 1 day ago with 1225 notes

    #feelings we have them  #cap 
    Important intelligence analysis

    melannen:

    Headcanon: Abed only got his job at SHIELD as a spousal benefit when they recruited Troy for their gadgets division

    Evidence, incontrovertible: When everything else in Fury’s car was broken, what was still 100% operational? THE AIR CONDITIONING.

    Bunny, related: Abed meets Sam while visiting Troy in the hospital and explains to him, scene by scene, why he is definitely the lead in a romcom, not the sidekick in an action movie.

    Lololol

    (via neenya)

    — 1 day ago with 2986 notes

    au where their lives aren’t constantly plauged by pain and they’re free to be ridiculous young adults in love that stare at each other fondly.

    (Source: thewintersoldier, via fyeahbuckysteve)

    — 1 day ago with 3232 notes

    theatlantic:

The Underrated, Universal Appeal of Science-Fiction

When I’m introduced to someone as a writer, a now familiar pattern of events often follows.
“Oh, really! How interesting!” the someone—let’s call her Jane—says, sounding quite enthusiastic. “What do you write?”
“Science fiction,” I say.
Jane instantly glazes over. “I’m afraid I never read science fiction.”
In other instances, people who know me have read a book of mine out of curiosity and then told me, in some surprise, that they liked it—“even though I don’t normally like science fiction.” Indeed, when a short story collection of mine won a non-genre prize, it was apparently a surprise to the judges themselves: According to the chair of the judging panel, “none of [them] knew they were science-fiction fans beforehand.”
The assumption seems to be that a book that comes with a genre label like “science fiction” must necessarily be lightweight stuff—not really comparable with “non-genre” works.
This may partly be due to the fact that the word “genre” has two different meanings which are often muddled up. The basic meaning of “genre” is simply kind or category or form of fiction, and in that sense, any work of fiction can be assigned to some genre or another. But “genre” is also used in a different way to make a distinction between “genre” and “non-genre” fiction. “Non-genre” fiction is the stuff that is placed on the “general fiction” or “fiction and literature” shelves in Barnes and Noble. “Genre” fiction is the stuff that is placed in its own designated corners: Crime, Fantasy, Romance, Horror, Science Fiction.
Read more. [Image: Phil Whitehouse / Flickr]

    theatlantic:

    The Underrated, Universal Appeal of Science-Fiction

    When I’m introduced to someone as a writer, a now familiar pattern of events often follows.

    “Oh, really! How interesting!” the someone—let’s call her Jane—says, sounding quite enthusiastic. “What do you write?”

    “Science fiction,” I say.

    Jane instantly glazes over. “I’m afraid I never read science fiction.”

    In other instances, people who know me have read a book of mine out of curiosity and then told me, in some surprise, that they liked it—“even though I don’t normally like science fiction.” Indeed, when a short story collection of mine won a non-genre prize, it was apparently a surprise to the judges themselves: According to the chair of the judging panel, “none of [them] knew they were science-fiction fans beforehand.”

    The assumption seems to be that a book that comes with a genre label like “science fiction” must necessarily be lightweight stuff—not really comparable with “non-genre” works.

    This may partly be due to the fact that the word “genre” has two different meanings which are often muddled up. The basic meaning of “genre” is simply kind or category or form of fiction, and in that sense, any work of fiction can be assigned to some genre or another. But “genre” is also used in a different way to make a distinction between “genre” and “non-genre” fiction. “Non-genre” fiction is the stuff that is placed on the “general fiction” or “fiction and literature” shelves in Barnes and Noble. “Genre” fiction is the stuff that is placed in its own designated corners: Crime, Fantasy, Romance, Horror, Science Fiction.

    Read more. [Image: Phil Whitehouse / Flickr]

    — 1 day ago with 226 notes

    absentlyabbie:

shinykari:

legete:

haipollai:

ok, idk how easy this is to read but since everyone is discussing dates, i went to the movie to check. this is steve’s rejection from the beginning, his birthday is in the upper right corner and there’s ANOTHEr date in the lower left which I think is supposed to be a today’s date kind of thing and it looks to be June 14 1943
so there we go, steve enlists in mid 1943

#this feels late for bucky to be enlisting #but that isn’t the issue
How interesting that you would mention this, because I’ve recently been thinking he didn’t enlist. His serial number, which he’s heard muttering when Steve comes to rescue him, starts “32557.”
According to this fabulous WWII serial number generator, an enlisted man from New York should have a serial number starting with the numbers “12.”
A New York man with a serial number starting with “32”? Drafted. What we may be dealing with here is a Bucky who didn’t choose to go to war but was instead compelled to do so versus a Steve who is desperate to get in. I think it opens up a lot of different and interesting storylines for the two of them.

There’s been some great meta/discussion about this in the last couple days, which I think is great.

Makes you wonder if Bucky got the draft, and then, knowing how Steve felt about things, told his best buddy he was “enlisting.” Because how do you face this skinny, brave idiot who just won’t stop trying to volunteer that you wouldn’t be going if you didn’t have to?


Ok, but seriously, Steve would have been aware that Bucky hadn’t volunteered in the past year and a bit and the draft had come in, right? Because not a moron?

    absentlyabbie:

    shinykari:

    legete:

    haipollai:

    ok, idk how easy this is to read but since everyone is discussing dates, i went to the movie to check. this is steve’s rejection from the beginning, his birthday is in the upper right corner and there’s ANOTHEr date in the lower left which I think is supposed to be a today’s date kind of thing and it looks to be June 14 1943

    so there we go, steve enlists in mid 1943

    #this feels late for bucky to be enlisting #but that isn’t the issue

    How interesting that you would mention this, because I’ve recently been thinking he didn’t enlist. His serial number, which he’s heard muttering when Steve comes to rescue him, starts “32557.”

    According to this fabulous WWII serial number generator, an enlisted man from New York should have a serial number starting with the numbers “12.”

    A New York man with a serial number starting with “32”? Drafted. What we may be dealing with here is a Bucky who didn’t choose to go to war but was instead compelled to do so versus a Steve who is desperate to get in. I think it opens up a lot of different and interesting storylines for the two of them.

    There’s been some great meta/discussion about this in the last couple days, which I think is great.

    Makes you wonder if Bucky got the draft, and then, knowing how Steve felt about things, told his best buddy he was “enlisting.” Because how do you face this skinny, brave idiot who just won’t stop trying to volunteer that you wouldn’t be going if you didn’t have to?

    Ok, but seriously, Steve would have been aware that Bucky hadn’t volunteered in the past year and a bit and the draft had come in, right? Because not a moron?

    (via fyeahbuckysteve)

    — 1 day ago with 13912 notes